The Sunday Subject – The Notebook

Good morning, grab a cup of coffee or tea and enjoy The Sunday Subject. This week’s subject is The Notebook.

No, not the 2004 film starring Ryan Gosling. The notebook, every stationary lover’s obsession.  I myself have many (many) notebooks scattered around my home, some beautiful, others practical, most totally empty because they’re just too nice to spoil with pencil or ink!  Notebooks bring me a scene of productivity and organisation, two things I often find I lack.

From a cheap and cheerful ring bound pad from Wilko, to the sleek and stylish Moleskine. The uses of a notebook are innumerable. Whether you’re a writer, artist, parent, student or astronaut everyone has a use for a notebook.

Maybe you make your own.  During the 17th and 18th century notebooks were made at home as and when they were needed by folding together pieces of paper.  Children were taught how to make them in school because information management was so important.  It wasn’t until around 1890 that notebooks started to be made and sold.  Scraps of paper were stitched together to make a small pad.  These quickly evolved into the ‘Legal Pad’  that we have today.  As with all things the notebook developed over time and the production processes changed to include, glueing, covering, spiral binding, ring binding and of course in the 20th century we were introduced to the practical, if less pretty, electronic note taking world.

I have to say, that even with the benefits of digital note taking, I don’t think I’ll ever fully switch from paper and ink to pixel and key.  Notebooks are a work of art, there’s so much character in a well used notebook, you just can’t beat it.

If you’re interested in learning how to bind a notebook here’s a list of UK based classes and The Book Studio in Norfolk offers courses during the winter months.

Or maybe you could just fold together a few sheets of paper…

I’d love to see your notebooks, whether home made or shop bought.  You can share them with me on twitter (@BeccyMundy) or send me a DM on Instagram (beccy_mundy).

 

Greatest Works…

Frequently I will write really great blog posts. Only, I don’t actually commit them to any kind of physical form. And so, as the day goes by, I forget what I had to say and the words are lost forever.  Some days I write blog posts in a physical medium, they might not be as good as the ones I write in my head, but it’s better to write them down and post them, right?

In terms of connecting with people and sharing my stories with other like minded people, yes, it is better to physically write something for people to see, but sometimes is the act of private creation not more important?

In order for me to post something I have to be the first person to like it and, to be honest, generally I feel that I’m the only person who has to like it. I only ask my husband to read it to make sure it’s comprehensible (there is no hope of other people liking it if they can’t even understand it).

By “writing” blog posts that never get written I’m developing my style, my voice. And even though I’m hugely disappointed when I have the feeling that something great has been lost, it gives me confidence to sit down and write anyway and occasionally I’ll run to the computer fast enough to get the post down.

I carry a notebook with me, I’m trying to get better at making quick and detailed notes to look at later and sometimes ideas make it to the pages but I still  find the posts I write in the shower or while I’m carrying shopping are much better than the ones I manage to get down on paper.  By writing them down I cease to continue developing them in my head and when I come to write up the post the moment is gone.

So as I sit and write this, with wet hair that possibly still has some shampoo in it,  I realise that maybe I don’t need to learn to write better notes: I need to learn to run faster.